Recovery

Obsessive compulsive disorder

Understanding obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

We all have thoughts or certain habits that we sometimes seem to frequently repeat. However some people have thoughts or compulsions that seem to obstinately take over their lives – this is obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

OCD was originally classified as an anxiety disorder due to the intense anxiety linked to its symptoms. But the American Psychiatric Association decided it needed its own classification in 2013. 

One reason is that it is a mental health condition that has seen a significant rise in the number of sufferers. Presently, OCD affects more than two million Americans.

This is the harrowing statistic from the Anxiety & Depression Association of America (ADAA). It is equally common among the sexes, with the average age of onset being just 19 years of age.

Compulsions and obsessions

OCD is defined as having a pattern of unwanted fears and thoughts – known as obsessions – that lead someone to perform repetitive behaviors – compulsions. These compulsions and obsessions interfere with daily life and cause a great amount of suffering.

Many people with OCD have both compulsions and obsessions. Despite attempts to ignore, control or be rid of such urges and intrusive thoughts, sufferers feel powerless over them.

Trying to stop them or at least ignore them only normally leads to anxiety and distress. So to ease these overwhelming negative feelings, someone with OCD feels increasingly compelled to do the compulsions and pay attention to the obsessions – and they end up in a vicious cycle of OCD.

To mask or numb such negative feelings means it’s more likely that an addiction might develop to such as alcohol or a behavioral addiction. As well, people can become very depressed about their situation.

Compulsions include things like counting items, repeatedly checking to see if a window or door is locked, cleaning and excessive hand washing. Even though most people with OCD know their behaviors don’t make any real sense, they still feel compelled to do them.

When there are obsessive thoughts it can cause extreme anxiety, sorrow, or pain. This is due to the fact that when certain disconcerting thoughts keep coming into their mind they are not certain they will not actually act on them – and this can cause self-esteem problems or even lead the person to loathe themselves.

Obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms

What are OCD symptoms?

People suffering from OCD have obsessive thoughts or compulsive behaviors that:

  • Use up at least one hour every day.
  • Disturb daily living, such as social life, work, studies or parenting.
  • Are not pleasurable. People do them because they feel they cannot stop.
  • Feel totally out of control.


OCD presents in many different forms, but most cases will involve some sort of:

  • Ordering and symmetry.

This is the compulsive need to do things in a specific order or to have items lined up in a certain way. For example, perhaps all tins of food in a cupboard or bathroom items have to have their front label showing. Or it could be that all books must be in a certain order, or clothes hanging in a wardrobe in a very particular way.

If one is left out of place by another family member or a visitor it can lead the person with OCD to feel angry or even physically sick. Their heartbeat can quicken and they can develop a cold sweat. They may swiftly get up to put the item in the order they feel that it has to be, and this can be viewed as bizarre behavior by onlookers.

  • Checking.

This includes repeatedly checking that such as an alarm is set; an oven is turned off; that all light switches are not left on; that taps are not running; that doors and windows are locked; that an email or other message has been sent, or repeatedly checking personal items have not been stolen or lost from pockets and bags.

  • Contamination fear.

This is when someone has extreme fear and anxiety about germs. They can have an obsessive, almost frenzied at times, compulsion to clean – even if everyone else thinks somewhere looks clean.

Their fear of germs is much more intense than most people’s (that is a natural part of our survival instincts). It might be that they don’t want to sit down on a chair that someone else might have sat on at some point or they always feel an overwhelming need to keep windows open even if it’s cold. They may also avoid, for instance, using public toilets or shaking hands with anybody.

As well as the fear of germs, there can also be terrific anxiety about other health risks such as potentially fatal impairments that could be encountered. Contamination fear can be so extreme it means some people avoid going to places where there could be any other people.

  • Obsessive thoughts. 

This could be constantly thinking about and being aware of various body sensations such as blinking or breathing. There might be a constantly perturbing suspicion about a partner being unfaithful, with no actual evidence for it. For some people with OCD, there are thoughts that seem relentless that can be violent or disturbing, including sexual thoughts with intrusive images.

Some mental health conditions are similar to OCD. These involve obsessions with:

  • Collecting things (hoarding disorder).
  • Picking at skin (excoriation).
  • Pulling out and/or eating hair (trichotillomania).
  • How somebody looks (body dysmorphic disorder).
  • Abnormal body odors (olfactory reference syndrome).
  • Physical illness (hypochondriasis).


Mental health experts have no definitive reason as to why some people get this disorder. But it has been observed that many people diagnosed with OCD have experienced trauma, including physical or sexual abuse, that was frequently during childhood. It could be that they are attempting to create order on the outside as they battle their internal chaos.

People struggling with OCD are often reluctant to seek the help they need because they feel embarrassed or ashamed. But there are proven methods to successfully treat OCD.

Our experienced professional team has helped people with all mental health and emotional issues for many decades now. Get in touch with us today to discuss how we can help you or someone you know.

Narcisissm treatment

What is narcissism?

Narcissism is a household word today. It’s a character trait used to describe many people and their behavior – and narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is a recognized mental health condition.

As narcissism is on a spectrum, that means that not every narcissist has NPD. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) between 0.5 and one percent of the population is diagnosed with NPD. Up to 75 percent of people with NPD are male.

It is a behavior that sees extreme selfishness and self-centeredness, an exaggerated sense of self-importance, excessive need to be admired, conceitedness, and a lack of or no empathy. Because a narcissist has little or no empathy they cannot see the world from anyone else’s point of view.

Consequently, they never understand the negative impact their behavior has on others around them. It makes it difficult for a narcissist to seek the treatment they desperately need, since asking for help does not fit their image.

For this reason, some experts believe in fact that up to five percent of the US population has NPD to some degree. As with all personality disorders, NPD can make daily living extremely difficult – especially with family, social, and work relationships.

Allure of image

An ancient Greek myth from where the word “narcissist” derives fully reveals this destructive fixation with oneself, a detrimental love of self-image.

Narcissus was a young man known for his beauty. But he rejected anyone who wanted any romance with him.

Then one day he saw his reflection in a pond. He fell deeply in love with it.

He simply could not move from the allure of his image. But eventually, he melted from the passion burning inside him and turned into a white and yellow flower that still bears his name today.

History of NPD

In 1898 psychologist Havelock Ellis used the term “narcissus-like”, referring to excessive masturbation when someone becomes their own sex object. A year later psychiatrist Paul Näcke used the word “narcissism” in a study of sexual perversions.

Then in 1911, psychoanalyst Otto Rank published the world’s first psychoanalytical paper specifically about narcissism. Three years later, renowned psychotherapist Sigmund Freud published a paper entitled: “On Narcissism: An Introduction.”

In 1980, NPD was officially recognized as a disorder in the DSM. While the DSM does not state any specific categories of the condition, it is generally accepted that there are two distinguishable types of NPD.

Narcissism types

These two types frequently have common characteristics – but are believed to derive from different childhood backgrounds. They can also indicate different ways a narcissist will behave in their relationships with others.


– Grandiose Narcissism

People with this type of narcissism have an image of being better than anyone else. They are grandiose and often deluded with their importance, act elite, ostentatious, lack any empathy, take advantage of others and are aggressive, arrogant, and dominant.

During childhood, they were most likely treated as if – and constantly told – they were superior and better than anyone else.


Vulnerable Narcissism

People with this type of narcissism are neurotic, carry feelings of shame, hypersensitive and their behavior is to protect them against the feelings of inadequacy they have deep down. So they fluctuate between feeling superior and inferior to others. 

Yet they suffer from anxiety and are resentful and defensive when other people do not treat them as if they are superior. Their conflict is that they are desperate for love and approval from everybody, so if it’s not given they will often withdraw and suffer from low self-esteem.

Someone with vulnerable narcissism – also known as covert narcissism – is more likely to develop alcohol or drug addiction or indulge in behavioral addiction. This is to mask or numb the negative feelings that frequently arise in them.

Their parents may have been unreliable – and they often struggle with toxic shame and a “failure of love”. They were often abused or neglected and suffered trauma during childhood.

Narcissism symptoms

Major signs of narcissism

Since many narcissists and people with NPD will never reach out for treatment, it is still being looked into by mental health experts. But there are some definite character traits that narcissistic people frequently display.

  • Using others.

Narcissists exploit others to gain something for themselves. They often find and surround themselves with people who will feed their enlarged egos. These relationships are shallow. In order to keep in control, a narcissist will keep people at a distance and go to almost any lengths to stay completely in charge at all times.

  • Ostentatious and pretentious.

They often have to own lots of flashy material things such as cars, homes, showy watches, jewelry and clothes that they think tell the world just how successful and wonderful they are. Their need for these things is frequently an overwhelming drive that if they were honest they would admit is out of control.

  • Oversensitive.

Even though they seem full of themselves, narcissists need constant attention and relentless admiration and praise to reinforce their fragile inner selves. This means that they are extremely sensitive and swift to anger if they are criticized or perceive something to be a criticism.

  • Sense of entitlement.

A narcissist insists on – and expects – special treatment because they have formed an image of themselves as being better and more important than anyone else. They will disregard rules – insisting that those are for people who are not as special as them, which in their mind is everyone else. They will demand that everybody always does exactly what they want and desire.

  • Manipulative.

A narcissist can be extremely charismatic and charming – at first. This is because they have become masters of manipulation in order to lure someone in and then get what they want from that relationship. So while a narcissist will attempt to impress and please in the beginning, it’s only so that as soon as they can they will put their own needs first and use the other person to that end.

  • Envy.

Many narcissists have an obsession with success and power. This is not only because they need to feed the overinflated image they have of themselves and to maneuver themselves into positions of control – but it’s also because they suffer from extreme envy and jealousy. Therefore, they are driven to make others envious and jealous of them instead.

  • Relentless need for praise and attention.

This is one of the major signs of a narcissist – a constant need for praise and admiration. They cannot get enough and will never be satisfied.

  • Lack of empathy.

A narcissist is unable to empathize with other people. They can only see the world through their eyes. So they have no humility or compassion – and cannot see anything wrong with their behavior or consequently take any responsibility for it. Frequently, a narcissist will never say the word “sorry”.

  • Arrogance.

Because they really believe they are superior to others, they will frequently be obnoxious, rude, and abusive when they get treatment or attention that they think is less than someone of their superiority deserves. Even if they are treated well or in a superior manner they will often act and speak rudely and be dismissive of others because they think the other people are inferior. A narcissist will have an overvalued (often deluded) sense of their own achievements and abilities.

Clearly, none of this makes for positive loving, and balanced relationships with anyone. If you recognize that you could be in a relationship with a narcissist, there are certain aspects that can be looked at and specific changes you can make.

It’s important to speak with someone with expertise in these matters as soon as possible. A narcissist will not see any problem in grinding someone down, including a partner, to get what they want.

Therapy can be especially challenging for people with NPD because they are often unwilling or unable to even acknowledge the disorder. But there are proven successful methods to treat it and help anyone with the condition.

Our experienced team has helped a great many people with all emotional disorders and types of mental health problems. Contact us today to talk about how we can help you or someone you know.

Addiction from prescription drugs

Addicted to prescription drugs?

Most people who take prescription drugs do so responsibly. But it is possible to become dangerously addicted to them. 

In fact, millions of Americans already are addicted. Many of those abusing them don’t realize that these medications can have the same serious health consequences as illegal street drugs.

Just because some drugs are prescribed by a medical expert does not make them less of a risk to health or any less potentially addictive. Prescription drug addiction can cause exactly the same problems and tragedy as addiction to alcohol or illegal drugs such as cocaine and heroin.

According to the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, around two million Americans misused prescription pain relievers for the first time within the previous 12 months. In addition, 1.5 million people misused tranquilizers; more than a million misused prescription stimulants, and 271,000 misused sedatives for the first time.

Prescription drug abuse is highest among adults aged 18 to 25, with nearly 15 percent using a medication in a non-medical manner. Several studies have found clear connections between prescription drug abuse and heavy alcohol use, higher rates of cigarette smoking, as well as the use of marijuana, cocaine, and other illegal drugs.

Addiction issues are just the same whether the drugs are prescribed or illegal. Beating the addiction can be just as difficult.

What are the most commonly abused prescription drugs?

Some prescription drug abusers begin after being given legitimate prescriptions for a medical issue. But they then get addicted to the medication, and take more than prescribed and more frequently than has been recommended.

But others will get them in another way: such as with forged prescription notes or from a dealer. Prescribed drugs that are most regularly abused are:

Opioids

Most often prescribed for pain, opioids produce a euphoric sedative effect. This includes such as tramadol that an increasing number of people are getting addicted to each year. Meperidine is another form of opioid sold under the brand name Demerol that’s used to treat moderate to severe pain.

Fentanyl

A synthetic opioid, it’s prescribed for acute pain. It creates feelings of euphoria and is up to 50 times stronger than heroin. But it is increasingly being used as a “recreational” drug frequently mixed with methamphetamine, cocaine or heroin.

Codeine

Used to treat mild to moderate pain as well as cold and flu symptoms in such as cough syrup. It can cause altered consciousness and has a sedative effect. Increasingly it is being used in a recreational drug cocktail known as “lean”, “purple drank” or “sizzurp”.

Alprazolam

Commonly sold under the brand name Xanax, alprazolam is a benzodiazepine (tranquilizer) used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. But it’s also misused for its swift sedating effects. It’s one of the most highly addictive prescription drugs.

Clonazepam & diazepam

These are benzodiazepines that are also used to treat panic disorders and anxiety. Clonazepam is most often sold under the brand name Klonopin; diazepam is mostly sold as Valium. But they are also often misused for their sedative effects and people can get highly addicted very quickly.

Amphetamine

Adderall is a prescription drug that creates similar effects to methamphetamine and so it is used as a stimulant for alertness and to increase productivity.  According to a report in The Washington Times, an estimated five million Americans are illegally using prescription stimulants.

Methylphenidate

Mostly sold under the brand name Ritalin, methylphenidate boosts the brain’s dopamine levels. It’s used to treat ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). But people abusing it can become highly addicted.

Prescription drugs addiction treatment

Major signs of prescription drug addiction

Prescription drug addiction can be harder to spot or admit than with illegal drugs or alcohol. This is because someone, for instance, addicted to a strong prescribed painkiller for a bad back may justify their abuse due to their physical condition.

Yet if they were to get honest with themselves they would admit they were addicted to the high the medication gave them. Prescription drug abusers can be very ingenious when it comes to hiding and denying their addiction.

However, there are some common signs that can show someone has a prescription drug addiction. These include:

  • Becoming defensive or angry when challenged about their use of prescription drugs.

  • Shopping online for prescription drugs.

  • Frequently visiting their physician.

  • Work, studies and/or home life suffers.

  • Less pride about personal appearance.

  • Constantly bringing attention to and complaining about health conditions that give them reason for taking prescription drugs.
  • Side effects can include mood swings, increased anxiety, sleep problems, drowsiness, being unsteady, memory issues and poor decision-making.


A hidden danger with prescription drug addiction is the mistaken belief that because doctors prescribe them they must be safe. But these drugs are prescription-only because they can be addictive and have serious health consequences.

If you think you might have a problem with prescription drugs or think someone you know has, it’s vitally important to seek immediate professional help.

Our expert team has treated people with all mental health conditions and addictions. Contact us now to hear how we can help you or someone you know.

Benefits of beating an addiction

Top six benefits of beating an addiction

When most people think of addiction they usually connect it with someone who’s addicted to drugs. This is certainly part of it – but there are many different addictions that can all adversely affect someone and those around them too.

This can range from an addiction to alcohol and drugs such as marijuana and heroin (and it can also include prescribed drugs like tramadol and Adderall) to behavioral addictions. This is a type of addiction that involves a compulsion to engage in a rewarding non-substance-related behavior.

It is similar to drink or drug addiction in that the person has scant regard for the mental, physical, financial  or social consequences of their behavior. It includes being addicted to gambling, sex, work, shopping, social media and gaming.

Any addiction can be described as indulging in something that is detrimental to the person and/or those around them – but that they cannot stop and stay stopped from doing.

Reasons behind addiction

Why do people become addicts?

There are many reasons why people become addicted to something. One reason is that they get some sort of high or reward from it.

Another is that it acts as a distraction. That’s not just the taking, using or doing – but the whole preparation, the frequent deceit that’s connected to it all, and then the coming out the other side and dealing with such as hangovers, comedowns and any mess or situations that were created.

Most addictions are all-consuming – and like that for a reason. It’s because another key reason someone becomes addicted to something is that they are attempting to mask or numb feelings that are so painful they are overwhelming.

Most addicts are people who are hurting inside very badly. Most often this is from a childhood trauma, although people do suffer from traumas later in life that adversely affect them too. Toxic shame and what is described as a “failure of love” often play a huge part too.

One of the most tragic things about addiction is that it gets progressively worse unless someone gets treatment. All addictions can be summed up by the slogan: the person took a drink; the drink took a person.

Living a healthy life after quitting an addiction

What are the benefits of quitting an addiction?

Thankfully, there are proven successful ways to beat any addiction. Regular one-on-one therapy and the Twelve Steps recovery program have both proved extremely effective over the years.

Many people who are abusing drink or drugs will need to detox first. This always needs to be managed by a team with expertise in detoxing as trying to detox at home can be dangerous.

But whatever the addiction, there are immense benefits from quitting, some more obvious than others. 

Here are six major benefits of beating an addiction:

1. Boosted energy & enthusiasm

One of the first benefits many people notice when they quit an addiction is that they have much more energy and a clearer head.

They will realize just how much of their thinking and energy was spent on an addiction. All that planning and preparation, the using, the getting through the hangovers and comedowns… It’s an utterly exhausting way to live.

Clarity of thought has a positive impact. Decision-making vastly improves and consequently there is less stress in life.

From working and parenting to playing sports or studying, there’ll be much more energy – and that’s all hugely beneficial.

2. Quality sleep

If drink or drugs were the problem, people will realize once they quit that what they thought was sleep was often more like “passing out” and waking up was “coming to”. It was not a decent sleep at all.

Poor sleep is often connected to stress, anxiety and depression. So it was a vicious cycle.

When tired we all tend to be more easily irritated and less tolerant. So a sound sleep is good for us and people around us, such as our family, friends and colleagues.

In recovery, people will look at anything that’s been taking their peace of mind. So as these things are dealt with, sleep will improve – and that has great benefits for each day as they wake up feeling refreshed and fully charged.

3. Improved health

When we sleep our body restores us. So having decent sleep improves our overall physical and mental health.  

Our immune system strengthens and that means we’re less likely to catch an illness. But if we do, we will recover much more quickly.

Having a good sleep and clearing our heads from all the problems of an addiction also makes it much less likely that we’ll have accidents or make mistakes. Life will be much less chaotic.

It means that instead of skipping meals or snatching something unhealthy while on the go, as many people with addictions do, there will be regular and relaxed meal times. Naturally health benefits will come too from not drinking excessively or using drugs that physically and mentally harm.

If a behavioral addiction was the problem then there will be much less stress in life. As is well known, stress is not beneficial to our health.

4. More spending power

It’s so commonly asked in utter bewilderment by many people when they get into recovery: how did I ever afford my addiction?

Obviously money that’s not spent on things such as drink, drugs, gambling and so on is available to spend on other much better things.

Also as people function better and have clearer heads for decision-making they will perform better at work – which can significantly boost earning power.

5. Increased hours

It’s often overlooked and not realized until it comes back after quitting an addiction: there’s much more time every day.

No more time is wasted on planning and preparation for the addiction; the taking, using, drinking or doing; and then the hangover or comedown. As well, picking up the pieces of the mess that’s all too often created.

Not to mention the energy that used to be spent on the deceit that frequently comes with an addiction. There will also be much less sick days and those hours of just getting through a day due to the negative impact of the day and/or night before.

So in recovery there are many more hours for the best things in life: spending time with family and friends, doing hobbies and pastimes, or just simply relaxing.

Life in addiction gets increasingly narrow as the addiction takes over. It is the opposite in recovery – and life opens up to some amazing new places, people and experiences.

6. You discover your true meaning

Just as addictions get progressively worse, so too recovery – if worked at on a daily basis – will get progressively better. This doesn’t mean spending hours every day, but usually means just doing a few things first thing and perhaps in the day too.

One of the greatest discoveries that people who quit addictions find is that they gain the chance to find out who they really are. All that drink, all those drugs and all those unhealthy behavioral addictions were keeping the real person down.

Recovery involves looking at reasons why someone became addicted to something. When these reasons are dealt with it allows the real person to shine through.

Consequently emotional health gets increasingly stronger. So aspects of living well such as having healthy boundaries will improve.

Being free from an addiction means people can feel their feelings. They will start to realize that our feelings are there to help us process, deal with and grow from things that happen in life.

Also, there is often spiritual growth that gives a great many lives a whole new meaning. As people discover their meaning it gives happiness and a priceless peace of mind.

It takes courage to reach out for help. But the results can be amazing for someone who does – and it will be of immense benefit to all those around them too.

Our luxury mansion home is in an inspirational stunning natural setting beside a beautiful calm and tranquil lake. It’s ideal for anyone’s recovery.

Every treatment we offer is totally individualized, so that it works in the swiftest and most effective manner for each of our guests. This is also to ensure recovery is strong and enduring – so it continues when you leave us.

Get in touch with us right now to speak in complete confidence. Find out how we can help you or someone you love.

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